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Wyse SX0 


 


 


 


 




























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SX0

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Overview

The Wyse SX0 is a small and (physically) lightweight thin client. It has a single serial port and lacks any PS/2 ports. There are two USB ports at the front and two USB ports on the rear. Inside is a QA(?) sticker dated 24th January 2008. It is available in a number of configurations which is reflected in the product ID : S10/S30/S50/S90.

From the marketing blurb:

S10  Featuring the blisteringly fast Wyse ThinOS designed for task-oriented environments.
S30  Windows CE for web browser functionality and terminal emulation for connecting to legacy systems.
S50  Complete with the latest Wyse Linux v6 operating system for fast web browsing, X-based sessions and simple environments.
S90  All the benefits of a Microsoft Windows XP Embedded desktop with fast secure access.

Unfortunately it looks like Wyse changed the design of the underlying hardware at some point (see below). Two S10s I have are identically labelled except in the part number. I also have an S90.

MODEL NO: SX0
PROD ID: Winterm S10
PART NO: 902105-02
DATE MANUFACTURED: DECEMBER 2005
   MODEL NO: SX0
PROD ID: Winterm S10
PART NO: 902110-02L
DATE MANUFACTURED: FEBRUARY 2007
   MODEL NO: SX0
PROD ID: Winterm S90
PART NO: 902099-06
DATE MANUFACTURED: JUNE 2005

Specifications

The basic specs for the SX0 are:

Processor
   Type
   Speed
AMD Geode GX500
366MHz
Memory
   Flash
     S10
     S30
     S50
     S90
   RAM
     S10
     S30
     S50
     S90

0MB
64MB
64MB or 128MB
512MB

128MB
128MB
128MB or 256MB
256MB
Video
   Chip
     -02
     -02L
   Max resolution

CS5535
CS5536
1600 x 1200 16-bit colour
Ports
   Network
   USB
   Serial
   Parallel
   PS/2
10/100
4 x USB2.0
1
none
none
Power
   Input
   Plug
   Off
   Running
12V 2.5A (from label)
Coax 5.5mm/2.1mm
0W
4-6W
Dimensions
W x H x D17.5cm x 3cm x 12.5cm

CPU

For those to whom it matters here is some detail from Linux's /proc/cpuinfo

vendor_id:Geode by NSC
cpu family:5
model:5
model name:Geode(TM) Integrated Processor by National Semi
stepping:2

Power Supply

The unit uses a small external power unit rated at 12V @2.5A

Expansion

This depends on the model number.

inside

The earlier model (902105-02) is not really expandable.

SX) flash detail

Flash: The flash is a Disk-On-Module using a non-standard connector. This can be seen the photos above - motherboard with DOM removed and the underside of the DOM. (Note: The IDE controller is a CS5535)

RAM: The RAM is soldered to the motherboard. It is not replaceable.

inside

The later model - 902110-02L - is easily expandable.

Flash: This model of the S10 comes with a standard 44-pin IDE connector.

I'm not too sure about the '0MB Flash' in the specification for the S10 as it obviously includes some standard firmware stored somewhere! (Once booted, under the 'Devices' tab in 'System Information', it does report "Rom Size: 2048KB     NAND Size: 0MB").

The S30 and S50 have a DOM connected to the 44-pin IDE connector.

The IDE controller is a CS5536.

RAM: The RAM is provided by a standard 200-pin PC2700 SO-DIMM. (Bottom of the photo). I have successfully replaced the supplied 128MB module with a Hynix 256MB module and also a G-TEK 512MB module. I don't know what the maximum size of memory is that the hardware supports.

The board includes a 44-pin IDE connector (top left in the photo). I connected a 2.5" drive to this which had Tinycore 2.7 installed. With this in place the S10 booted and ran Tinycore Linux from the hard disk in preference to its internal operating system.

There is very little space internally and you couldn't even shoehorn in a 1.8" drive. The S30 and S50 use a DOM. Possibly a cable (or direct) connected Compact Flash card adaptor could be fitted.

Miscellaneous

Wyse S10 switch

A recent purchase (May 2011) included two examples of the early S10s (hence the updated page). One of them wouldn't power up. When I removed the top the reason for this was evident (see photo left) - there was a significant gap between the push button and the switch on the PCB and even when the button was fully depressed it failed to make contact with the PCB mounted switch. Neither had bits missing and I couldn't see how this misalignment could happen. I ended up with the lo-tech solution of sliding a small folded up piece of paper into the gap. This fixed the problem.

 


Any comments? email me. Last update May 2013